Are you only half the leader you could be? See if you have this limiting self-belief

In their latest post for Fast Company online, management experts Scott and Ken Blanchard share that, “One of the big mistakes we see among otherwise promising managers is the self-limiting belief that they have to choose between results and people, or between their own goals and the goals of others. We often hear these people say,…

How do you deal with emotion at work?

Scott Blanchard, principal and executive vice president at The Ken Blanchard Companies calls it the new “F” word—feelings.  And it is something that managers and organizations struggle with on a regular basis.  Should you ask people to repress feelings and “check them at the door” or should you encourage people to bring their entire selves…

“Be the change” you want to see in your customer service people: 5 ways to get started

In a recent Legendary Service course, one of my participants—we’ll call him Chad—wondered aloud if leaders ever adhered to the same standards they continually ask of their service providers. When asked for an example of what he meant by this, he said, “Well … we are asked to acknowledge the customer, get details about the…

Who’s Got Your Back? 5 ways to find out

One of the hardest things for brilliant, technically proficient folks to realize is that as they assume more and more leadership responsibility they must depend on the help of others.  And each of these “others” is an individual who needs to be seen, heard and understood. One of the strategies you can use to map…

Advice for leaders: How Dr. Martin Luther King points the way

Today is Martin Luther King Day in the United States, a time to reflect back on the life and teachings of the great civil rights leader and activist. While most of us will not be called to engage in social activism on the scale that Dr. King did, we can still have a great impact…

Even When the Information Is Confidential, Make Sure the Process Is Still Open

“Make sure that people understand your reasoning and process. If you decide that some information is just too sensitive to share openly, that’s okay. Just be sure that the process you use isn’t seen as secretive. In the absence of openness, people will imagine the worst,” says Scott Blanchard in a recent column for Fast…