New Survey Data Shows Managers Not Meeting Employee Expectations in Three Key Areas

Training Magazine Manager Meetings & MotivationNew survey data just published in the July/August issue of Training magazine shows a serious gap between employee desires and reality when it comes to goal setting, goal review, and performance feedback from their managers.

More than 700 of the magazine’s subscribers were asked what they wanted out of their individual meetings with their managers and how that compared to what was really happening.

Questions were asked on a wide variety of issues related to one-on-one meetings—including frequency, duration, and topics discussed.  In three key performance management areas—goal setting, goal review, and performance feedback, employees identified a serious gap between how often they discussed these topics versus how often they wish they were discussing them.

Here are some of the key takeaways:

  • Goal Setting Conversations—Some 70 percent of people want to have goal-setting conversations often or all the time, but only 36 percent actually do. And 28 percent say they rarely or never discuss future goals and tasks.
  • Goal Review Conversations—Some 73 percent of people want to have goal review conversations often or all the time, but only 47 percent actually do. And 26 percent say they rarely or never discuss current goals and tasks.
  • Performance Feedback ConversationsSome 67 percent of people want to have performance feedback conversations often or all the time, but only 29 percent actually do. And 36 percent say they rarely or never receive performance feedback.

IMPLICATIONS FOR LEADERS

The performance management literature is clear on the importance of setting goals, providing feedback, and reviewing performance on a frequent basis. How is your organization doing with helping managers get together with direct reports to set goals, provide feedback, or discuss direction and support where needed?

If people haven’t been meeting as regularly as they should, use this survey data as a starting point to encourage managers and direct reports to schedule their next one-on-one soon. People want and need to have conversations with their immediate supervisors. It’s one of the foundations for strong, productive relationships that align people with the work of the organization in a satisfying and meaningful way. Don’t wait—your people and better performance are waiting!

PS:  You can see all of the data and charts by downloading the article PDF from the July/August issue of Training magazine.

7 thoughts on “New Survey Data Shows Managers Not Meeting Employee Expectations in Three Key Areas

  1. Great data for supporting real leadership. The problem I have seen is that, as a culture, we are so focused on short-term gains that we never put in the work for a long-term investment (people). We have to make the structure that will support time investment in people instead of crunching the budget.

    • Hi Anthony–I think you are exactly right. Time is the issue. Both the short term/long term aspect you’re describing –but also the time crunch so many managers are facing. Even the best intentioned managers are finding it hard to find the time to meet with their people on a regular basis.

  2. Pingback: New Survey Data Shows Managers Not Meeting Employee Expectations in Three Key Areas | El Timbre del Zaguán

  3. My last place of employment had implemented a once a month goal assessment, planning and evaluation program. Staff was intimidated at first but really held employee and employer accountable. Real tangible goals were being met. Productivity, less waste, reeturn business and profits.

    • Hi Suzy,
      Thanks for sharing your encouragement that setting goals, and setting aside time for review pays off. Yes, it is uncomfortable in the short term, but the results are there if you stick with it!

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